Sodwana Bay News
Peter Timm - A Legend in our Time
Written by Administrator    Saturday, 21 June 2014 12:35    PDF Print E-mail

This week, Triton lost its leader, creator and a vital, inspiring, powerful and generous man who deeply touched so many lives. Peter Timm was a partner, father, brother, friend, dive buddy, instructor, skipper, boss, mentor, teacher, electrician, builder, pilot, mechanic, plumber, photographer, honorary officer and citizen scientist. An exceptional man who did so many things for so many people. Capable, innovative and determined, Peter and his team created a place and a business that brought so much happiness, beautiful memories, great energy, direction and personal growth. He loved to learn and he was a natural teacher. So many people experienced his generosity of spirit, time and incredible skills. He also had a way with words - not just in terms of the “Peter Timm woordeboek” but in his way of making things better, of making you laugh and stretching individuals to achieve beyond what they thought was possible. He was a man of action and empowered and inspired others, leaving a legacy in diving, discovery, marine research and human relationships.

Peter died still believing he could fix anything and who could blame him. He fixed so much. He also died doing what he loved. He loved helping people and he was motivated by a challenge. He was a competent and very experienced technical diver and he ascribed to the spirit of trimix diving expressed by fellow deep diver Forrest Young …..

Peter and the Coelacanth“In this, some might find me incautious, but exploration always has had an element of risk and in the end, we are all mortal and it is how we carry on our lives during this brief existence that makes all the difference as to who we really are. Rest assured that we take

every step to make our projects as safe as possible but in the end, in the depths, it is between us and the deep blue sea.”

Peter loved and lived these words.
Written by the “Baby Doctor” Dr Kerry Sink

“Eve, Rolleen (his business partner and co-founder of Triton, his daughters, Vanessa and Jade, and the Triton staff thank everyone for their kind condolences. Peter’s legacy will live on at Triton and we thank you for your continued support. Triton will be re-open for business on 1 July”

Last Updated ( Thursday, 26 June 2014 07:41 )
 
Launch of new sea science and species mapping project makes a splash
Written by Eve    Thursday, 27 March 2014 13:26    PDF Print E-mail

Cape Town, 18 March 2014.

Marine biologists, students, citizen scientists and marine decision makers have joined forces in a new collaboration to unlock marine biodiversity knowledge and opportunities in South Africa. The SeaKeys project aims to collect and distribute genetic, species and ecosystem information to support wise decision making in the marine environment. This information is vital as expanding marine activities such as seabed mining, oil and gas activities and alternative energy initiatives compete for space with established fisheries and recreational use of the country's seas. Core to the project are several new marine citizen science projects that invite contributions from the public. by Dr Kerry Sink

Read more...  [Launch of new sea science and species mapping project makes a splash] Last Updated ( Wednesday, 09 April 2014 10:23 )
 
iSimangaliso’s oceanic heritage by Dr Kerry Sink
Written by Eve    Friday, 28 February 2014 15:05    PDF Print E-mail

After spending nine months attached to a coelacanth, anArgos Mini-PAT satellite tag was recovered by Triton staff offshore and 16 kilometres south of Jesser Point at the Sodwana Bay node of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. The coelacanth, the 26th of 32 individuals known from South Africa’s first World Heritage Site was tagged by Trimix Divers on the 13 May 2013 in Jesser Canyon, 12 km south of the site where the tag popped up at 1am on 8 February 2014.

Lights, Camera, Action

Read more...  [iSimangaliso’s oceanic heritage by Dr Kerry Sink] Last Updated ( Wednesday, 09 April 2014 10:36 )
 
South Africa's Two Oceans
Written by Administrator    Wednesday, 29 August 2012 10:17    PDF Print E-mail

iSimangalisoThere are few places on this blue planet that can match the marine diversity found along the shores of Southern Africa.  Two very different oceanic currents flank the coast of the southern tip of the African Continent. The west coast of Southern Africa is surrounded by the cold Benguela Current and on the east coast the warm Agulhas Currents moves south from the tropics. These two currents create not only two radically different marine environments but also shape the terrestrial ecosystems and the human settlements along the South African coast.

 

 

Read more...  [South Africa's Two Oceans] Last Updated ( Monday, 04 February 2013 08:26 )
 
South Africa's Coral Reef MPAs
Written by Administrator    Wednesday, 08 December 2010 11:08    PDF Print E-mail

South Africa’s coral reefs stretch for approximately 150 km along the northern KZN coast from north of Cape Vidal to the Mozambique border. TheSlingers reefs are separated into 3 groups termed the northern, central and southern complex and are situated in the Maputaland Marine Reserve and St Lucia Marine Reserve. Combined these two marine parks form part of the iSimangoliso Wetland Park, which was proclaimed a World Heritage Site in 1999. Although all of the coral reefs lie within marine protected areas (MPA) they do not have the same levels of protection i.e certain reefs are located within sanctuaries while others are designated multiple-use zones.

Why are MPAs necessary? 

Unless managed sustainably, the uses and users of marine ecosystems can threaten, change and destroy the very processes and resources that they depend on. 

Marine protected areas help protect important habitats and representative samples of marine life and can assist in restoring the productivity of the oceans and avoid further degradation. They are also sites for scientific study and can generate income through tourism and sustainable fishing. MPAs provide a range of benefits for fisheries, local economies and the marine environment. 

South Africa is very fortunate that all of its coral reefs are situated within MPAs. However, there has been limited research conducted on the affects of human activities in the different MPA zones. DoPeacock_Rockcod these activities influence the fish communities and if so, to what extent? 

 

Read more...  [South Africa's Coral Reef MPAs] Last Updated ( Wednesday, 08 December 2010 11:39 )
 
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